Before we get to the above question I’d like to first say thank you to all the readers who’ve made Milenomics the success it has become.  Changing the world happens slowly, and changing the mile and point world is no exception to that.

I started writing this blog because I thought that this particular view of how Miles and points work (and don’t work) needed more publicity.  In doing so I’ve pushed for us to think that our time is valuable, that our miles are to be used, and that our costs are very real.

Along the way I’ve also tried to write “complete” posts. April probably saw some of the densest posts I’ve had on here. I’m especially proud of the two posts on the Fidelity card here and here, as well as the Purchase Tracking Sheet post from earlier this month.

I’ve got 200,000 Problems. Or, Maybe I Don’t.

I installed a new plugin on the site, Word Stats from Fran Ontanaya. I love it. Originally I wanted to install it to make sure I wasn’t showing preference for one specific airline or topic. After loading it up and checking word count I found the following information:

Wordcount Milenomics
From day one to today on the blog.

 

I’ve written over 200,000 words since starting the blog.  I sure hope some of those words have been good! I’m also glad to see the word ‘miles’ is the #1 most used word on the blog, and not a single airline or credit card company made the cut of the top 20 words used. I have no conscious allegiance to one airline or bank and I’m glad that subconsciously I don’t either.

I take great joy in working on these academic type posts.  Lately posts have been taking me more than a day to write.  The video component of the Routing post gave me a chance to work on editing, and working with video and audio tools.  I’m looking to challenge myself and learn more about blogging and I’ve enjoyed trying new [subtle] things here on the blog.

Soliciting Feedback: What would you like to see?

The last time I solicited feedback was nearly 6 months ago (New Years’ Day actually).  So I’m here today asking for more.  The question on my mind is: Shorter posts? Or no change? 

However, feel free to sound off on anything/everything about the blog:

  • Hate the font?
  • Think it is time for me to quit?
  • Want a new Logo?
  • Have a specific topic you’d like to see flushed out on here?
  • Tired of my blabbering
  • Or Anything else…let me know!

All is fair in love and miles. 

Against my instincts I’ve kept this post under 500 words–the rest is up to you!

–Sam

– Written by Sam Simon. All ideas are my own, but I encourage you to see my point of view and I promise I’ll try to do the same. Connect with me on Twitter @Milenomics.

21 thoughts on “Soliciting Reader Feedback: Longer or Shorter Posts?

  1. I may be a geek, but I like charts and graphs in blogs… There’s never too much information, as long as your blogs cover different angles. I don’t like to read the same subject from every blogger each day.

    As long as you’re willing to blog, you’ll have readers.

  2. Sam, first, the bad news. Yes, your posts are a bit long! That being said, they are worth the effort and the time to read them. I look forward to each one.

  3. Can you do a post on the opportunity cost of one method of MS Vs another. Ex. If get visa giftcards @ an office supply and you cash out via AP you lose the points you would earn by just using AP

  4. ‘Too long’ is when the piece takes substantially more words to adequately express the point(s) than necessary.

    Your posts are typically much too long for a brand newbie, as well as those for whom the concepts have thoroughly clicked. Neither are your target audience (you have introductions for the former). For the majority, they’re reading for more than a superficial treatment, so you’re probably hitting it right.

  5. Very thorough posts with a unique perspective. I really, really, liked the video embedded in the post earlier this week. The posts aren’t necessarily too long but on a rare occasion there are long winded sections. I enjoy the blog so much that I don’t mind wading through the details to get to the good stuff.
    I especially like how you promote BYOE, zero EQM, and spend not hoard your miles.

    Since earning miles requires less skill and planning than spending them, I prefer posts on how to best spend/stretch miles vs posts on how to earn miles.

  6. I pretty much like what you have been doing so far… Logo though… Looks like a Highschool related logo… Give me something that screams milenomics! When there are long posts I usually just wait until I have enough time to read throughly but I don’t feel you have made a long post that is not worth reading!

  7. As an economist myself, I’d say a logo incorporating curves reflecting some sort of equilibrium would be appropriate. Of course, logos are more marketing than economics 😉

  8. Length is just fine.

    I’d like to see more discussion of “simplifying the hobby” (how to keep it manageable and fun without feeling the need to “maximize” all the time)

  9. One more thing: I thought a bit about what posts I have that are bookmarked and referenced frequently. One set that I use a lot is the “How to book award tickets using XXX currency” by MMS a while ago. That is a gold mine for when I am about to book—I just reread the relevant parts.

    You could update the content to reflect all the changes and then I’m sure people would find that immensely useful.

    I echo what others have written above about it being easy to get the miles but darn difficult to burn them well.

  10. I like the detail in your posts and your general writing style. It’s appropriate for a blog with its friendly tone and short paragraphs. I suggest you give a short, informative abstract at the beginning of each article to allow the reader to decide whether or not to read the whole post. Thanks for your wonderful advice!

  11. I love your posts. I’d like to see posts more frequently. I really like that you factor time into your outlook. I haven’t seen “emotional bandwidth” for miles/points/manufactured spending discussed much. For some, rejection by cashiers or forms and phone calls to get the money or points posted correctly takes a toll that isn’t measured in time or money.

    • That’s an interesting point that I don’t remember anyone else really discussing. It can be really hard to go back and try the same thing with a different cashier after being made to feel like a criminal by one. Luckily it’s never been that bad for me, but I do get varying responses to buying $500 GCs … from smiles and checking my ID, to scowling and “I don’t think we are allowed to do transactions over $500” (because the fee puts it over $500). I’ve started using the purchase tracking tool to make notes about the staff I interact with to be sure I’m not pushing it with people who aren’t comfortable with what I’m trying to do. And to know who is relaxed about it so I know I can go ahead and buy a couple at a time.

  12. I like the long posts with lots of information. And I also like the tone/personality of your blog. Whoever suggested above that you put an abstract paragraph at the beginning of the really long posts… that was a good idea.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: